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Group of students turned away at the White House, here’s why

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A group of New Jersey students didn’t quite receive the warmest welcome on a field trip to the White House on Nov. 15.

The seven-grade class from Henry Hudson Regional School containing three foreign students from Sweden and Columbia was prohibited from entering the building after traveling on a long bus ride amid a severe snowstorm, according to the NY Post.

Despite Henry Hudson submitting a list of the student’s names for clearance a month in advance and passing the initial checkpoint it wasn’t enough to stop the Secret Service agents from banning the three foreign school kids from joining the tour.

Apparently, the three students were without passports or any other identification which is considered a threat to national security at the White House.

Henry Hudson administrators apparently did not verify that all students had the right ID before hitting the road, parents told The Post. “They are here on visas, but they didn’t bring any of that stuff,” a dad said. “They didn’t have any ID on them.”

“What are 12 -and 13-year-olds going to do? It doesn’t make sense,” another parent added.

Following the dreadful trip, the Henry Hudson Regional School District took to Facebook to share a class photo, captioning the pic, “It was an experience to remember!”

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Amber Guyger served with shocking sentence for the murder of Botham Jean

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 More than one week after her trial started and a day after she was found guilty of murder, Amber Guyger has been sentenced to 10 years, WFAA reports.

The jury has reached a sentence in the murder case against Amber Guyger.

The former Dallas officer was sentenced to 10 years.

Guyger was found guilty of murder Tuesday morning and the jury began sentencing deliberations Wednesday afternoon.

During closing arguments, the state asked the jury to sentence Guyger to a minimum of 28 years – the age Botham Jean would be today if he was still alive.

Judge Tammy Kemp told jurors that they could also consider “sudden passion.”

Texas law defines sudden passion as “passion directly caused by and arising out of provocation by the individual killed.”

Under sudden passion, a defendant faces between a two and 20-year sentence.

Over a two-day period, character witnesses for Jean and Guyger took the stand.

Bertrum Jean was first to be called by the state Wednesday morning.

“I loved my Sunday morning,” he told the courtroom Wednesday. “My Sundays have been destroyed.”

Sundays, he told the courtroom, were the days he would talk with his son on the phone after Jean returned home from church.

“Sundays are not a good day for me,” he said, breaking down in tears several times while on the stand. “Because I’m not hearing his voice.”

Jean’s mother took the stand the day before.

“I cannot sleep,” she told the courtroom. “I cannot eat. It’s just been the most terrible time for me.”

Karen Guyger, Amber’s mother, was the first witness called by the defense Wednesday.

She also became emotional on the stand as she described a young Amber Guyger, who she called sweet and someone who easily made friends.

Karen Guyger testified that a former live-in boyfriend molested Amber when she was 6 years old. He was later arrested on a charge of indecency with a child, she said.

“She was very upset,” Karen Guyger said of when her daughter first told her about the shooting. “I couldn’t understand her because she was crying so hard.”

“She wanted to take his place,” Guyger’s mother said. “She always would tell me she wished she could have taken his place.”

Tuesday, the day Guyger was found guilty, the former Dallas police officer was booked into the Dallas County jail. She was taken into custody outside of the jury’s presence at the end of the day.

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All Hail the Queen of Climate Strikes –– Greta Thunberg

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Greta Thunberg –– a fearless 16-year-old Swedish climate change activist who’s influencing youth around the globe to take action against global warming. 

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Thunberg has inspired the birth of more than 2,400 events across an estimated 115 countries and 1,000 cities from Sept. 20–27 as part of the UN climate summit. On Sept. 23, the changemaker is scheduled to make a formal address. 

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A few years ago, no one knew her name and, now, Thunberg has become a pint-sized force to be reckoned with, and politicians have taken notice. Who is she? Where is she from? How did she gain 1.2 million supporters? Here’s the scoop below:

 August 2018 changed the game…

In her home country of Sweden, Greta staged the first school strike for climate change) outside the Swedish parliament building in August of last year. Thunberg had been inspired by a previous school class walk-out, in Florida against US gun violence, and she thought it was the best way to break ground.

GretaThunberg/Facebook

It was just after Europe had experienced a record-breaking heatwave and forest fires had raged through Sweden. Her parents were unsure and none of Thunberg’s classmates were willing to join, but she went by herself, with her bike, a hand-painted sign, and climate change fact sheets.

Thunberg staged her strike every day until the Swedish national election and, slowly but surely, people started to join her.

Environmental consciousness runs in the Thunberg family…

 Her father is Svante Thunberg, an actor, and author named after Svante Arrhenius, the Nobel prize-winning scientist who first calculated how carbon dioxide emissions could lead to the greenhouse effect.

GretaThunberg/Facebook

 Thunberg’s diagnosis’ fuel her fire for change…

She was diagnosed with Asperger’s Syndrome four-years-ago and she has since learned how to use it as a driving force in her campaigning, instead of letting it hold her back. Her Asperger’s means that Thunberg finds facts she learns about the environment more upsetting and distressing than others, and she can’t easily shake those feelings off. It’s spurred her on to act. She has also been diagnosed with OCD and selective mutism.

Thunberg discovered peace in panicking…

When she first learned about the climate crisis, she could not believe that adults weren’t making big enough changes.

“Our house is on fire. I am here to say, our house is on fire,” Thunberg wrote in a column for The Guardian. “Adults keep saying: ‘We owe it to the young people to give them hope.’ But I don’t want your hope. I don’t want you to be hopeful. I want you to panic. I want you to feel the fear I feel every day. And then I want you to act.”

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Sandy Hook ‘Back to School’ PSA leaves Chills up America’s Spine

A gut-wrenching public service announcement produced by Sandy Hook Promise, a gun violence prevention group in Newtown, CT, took social media by storm Wednesday. The chilling PSA highlights the harsh reality of gun violence threatening the lives of millions of students across America when stepping foot on a school campus. The video quickly took a repugnant turn, as a gunman enters the school, forcing many students to use everyday “essential” supplies in the face of a possible school shooting.

Sandy Hook Promise aims to not only remember the victims of gun violence but to also to help prevent future gun crime.

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