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McCall makes your retro, rock-pop dreams come true

Alina Robinson

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Atlanta-born, LA-based singer-songwriter, McCall is leaving an indelible mark on the music scene. Inspired by the natural progression of life, her bluesy-rock pop grooves explore relationships, femininity, and everything else that makes McCall –– McCall. With powerhouse harmonies and melodies that burrow a vintage genre, her aesthetic is one that transports retro pop-rock fervor into the digital age.

McCall’s most recent single, “Stone Cold,” is an addictive record that evokes flashbacks of toxic bonds. The track is supported by impressive guitar dexterity, providing a solid core for her symmetrical lyrics.

There’s something effortlessly genuine about the natural blend of McCall’s tunes, breathtaking voice, and her bad*ss energy, but we’ll let you be the judge.

McCall’s next single, “Lavender” drops Feb. 21.

“Stone Cold,” is a song that explores that frustrating feeling of not being able to let go of a relationship that’s not good for you. How do you break yourself free from that kind of toxicity (that can be addicting at times) and walk away?

Oh, I’m not good at it all. I’m definitely very addicted to that feeling of trying to make someone like you. What I do is binge listen to all the songs that we would listen to when we were together, to their music if they were musicians, and kind of get all my bad feelings out to prove to myself I’m not afraid to listen to those songs anymore. I don’t know; it’s really hard, actually. I feel like I don’t have good advice on it. I just write about it a lot, and eventually it will fade out. I’m coming out of a relationship now. We broke up nine months ago, but just now I’m out of the toxicity of it. It takes a while; you just have to ride it out.

In a world where we’re always looking for the next best thing, or rather constantly leaving and finding something new (and sometimes better, sometimes not), what is the fine line between settling and not settling?

That’s a great question. It’s kind of hard to settle because someone is always doing better than you or someone is always getting that opportunity that you wanted or even an opportunity that you hadn’t even thought about and then you’re like, “Wow, why didn’t I think about that?” Music-wise, that’s a good thing for me, because even when I feel like I’ve accomplished something, I look at my peers and they’ve accomplished something better. That can be helpful and hurtful in certain ways. Relationship-wise, you need to have that feeling because obviously, there’s always someone more attractive or whatever but it’s really hard to find that one person you connect to perfectly. It’s hard but you just have to see what clicks and what doesn’t.

Nick Smiley

The lyrics, “Leaving me lonely / But I can’t walk away,” from “Stone Cold” is such a heavy statement. Why do you think even when we don’t feel good or feel like we’re like it’s going nowhere, we still stay?

I think it depends on the relationship. For me, what “Stone Cold” was about wasn’t a real relationship. It was just about a friend of mine; we mutually liked each other, and it never really worked out. That line is wanting so badly to be liked by this person and to feel worthy of their time that when they don’t give it to you, you’re upset but you’re still willing to try again and again. You’re willing to change things about yourself just for the pure idea that they might like that. That feeling can be addicting –– it’s like a puzzle, it’s like what else can I do to make this person like me or change the way they feel about me even if it’ll never work because we’re not right for each other.

Well said. So, in both contexts of relationships as well as the music industry, what pushes you and motivates you to keep going when it feels like nothing’s going right or rather, your expectations aren’t met?

This sounds kind of cheesy, and I don’t really know what type of God I believe in or the universe, but I really feel that this is what I’m supposed to be doing. I give a lot up to the universe and I’ll know it’s all going the way it needs to go. I work really hard so when things don’t turn out how they should, it’s easier to accept that it wasn’t in the stars.

Alina Robinson

Hope can be a tricky thing when it comes to how we deal with our problems, relationships, mental health, even the issues with our world today. We tend to hold onto the past in hopes that something will change. Obviously, that’s not always the case and more often than not, it won’t ever happen. How do you think we can navigate that?

There comes a time, if you’re really honest with yourself, you’ll realize that you’re holding onto something that’s not worth it anymore. That’s a really hard place to get to, and I think I definitely overstay my welcome in hopes. If you aren’t honest with yourself and the situation, at some point something is going to knock you so hard off your feet that you don’t have a choice but to come to that realization. Just taking time to think with yourself, self reflect, check in, and be like, “Is this actually the right thing to do?”

The music video for “Stone Cold” is the perfect mixture of aesthetically pleasing but still conveys that frustrated feeling of not being able to walk away. The value of visual art is equally as important as the audio in regards to who you want to represent as an artist. What do you feel like you’ve been representing with your music?

Ooh, what a great question. Griffin Meyer directed the music video and we collaborated a lot on the aesthetics. He did an absolutely amazing job. Ursula Bowling was the art director and she killed it as well. I had a great team on that video. We went with this theme of Venus because I feel like what I want to represent is femininity and kind of changing what being a woman means. I’ve always felt very masculine and very tomboy-ish. Sometimes, I feel like I missed out on this “high” femininity that Venus represents.

So with this video, and the music that’s out and the music that’s about to come, I’m just trying to say, “I am a woman.” And that you know, just redefining what it means today to be a woman and what strength and power look like.

It’s an amazing video, and “Stone Cold,” is amazing as well. Congratulations on everything!

Thank you so much. I’ve been sitting on these songs we have yet to put out, and some of them, it’s been years. So we’re just going to put them out and see what happens. I’m really excited!

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Watch the intergalactic video for Gesaffelstein and Pharrell William’s ‘Blast Off’

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Jay-Z to Re-Open New York’s Webster Hall

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Just when you thought Jay-Z couldn’t make any more business moves, he pulls out the big guns. The rap mogul is slated to perform the first concert at New York City’s newly renovated Webster Hall. The “B-Sides 2” show will take place on April 26.

The iconic venue owned by BSE Global and Bowery Presents underwent a lengthy 20-month renovation, reportedly adding an elevator among other modern advancements.

Tickets to Jay-Z’s “B-Sides 2” concert at Webster Hall “for Day 1 fans” go on sale on April 19 at 11 a.m. ET. A pre-sale for AMEX cardholders begins April 18 at 10 a.m. ET. Jay-Z held “B-Sides” concerts at New York City’s Terminal 5 in 2015.

Take a look at some of the upcoming show dates below.

Patti Smith on May 1
Sharon Van Etten on May 4
Broken Social Scene on May 16 and 17
MGMT May 22 – 24
Real Estate on June 14
Built to Spill on September 30
October 1
Chris Robinson Brotherhood on October 9

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REVOLT and AT&T partner for the REVOLT Hip Hop Summit

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Revolt and AT&T just announced the launch of the Revolt Hip Hop Summit, expanding the multi-city cultural event inspired by the former Revolt Music Conference to two new markets — Atlanta and Los Angeles — and re-imagining the event to include opportunities for young people to network and develop skills business owners desire.

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AT&T will serve as co-creator and exclusive presenting sponsor of the event, expanding its reach and providing greater access for those seeking to become future leaders.

“Now more than ever we need to own our culture,” Revolt chairman Sean “Diddy” Combs said in a press release. “At the Revolt Hip Hop Summit we will empower young people with sessions on the issues they care about. From entrepreneurship and economic empowerment to social justice, we’ll have the provocative conversations not happening anywhere else. With the support of AT&T, we will provide perspective on music and media that could only come from industry veterans committed to our future.”

The event will take place from July 25-27 in Atlanta and Oct. 24-26 in Los Angeles. In addition to showcasing performances from major and emerging artists, the Summit will be  an immersive experience in the world of Hip Hop and culture, offering young people real-life networking experience and helping them to develop and hone the crucial skills business owners need to grow their companies.

“One of the hardest parts of breaking into any field is building a network and making connections with people that can help inspire dreams into reality,” said AT&T SVP-advertising and creative services Valerie Vargas in a press release. “AT&T is a longstanding champion of mentorship across both business and entertainment and we hope the opportunities stemming from the Revolt Hip Hop Summit help young people find their place.”

Headliners and ticket sales for the Atlanta and LA events will be announced soon. 

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