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Thousands unite in Hong Kong to protest against China extradition law

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Tens of thousands of people hit Hong Kong’s streets on Sunday, April 28, to protest against a government plan to allow extraditions to mainland China, the crowds swollen by anger over the recent jailing of democracy leaders.

The extradition proposal has already sparked large protests and mounting alarm within the city’s business and legal communities who fear it will hammer the financial hub’s international appeal and tangle people up in China’s opaque courts.

But Sunday’s protest was one of the biggest in the city in recent years, according to CNN.

The demonstration comes just days after 4 prominent leaders of Hong Kong’s democracy movement were jailed for their role in organizing mass pro-democracy protests in 2014 that brought parts of the city to a standstill for months

Demonstrators on Sunday chanted “Step down, Carrie Lam!” – referring to the city’s pro-Beijing leader, while many held the yellow umbrellas that symbolized the 2014 rallies.

Police said some 22,000 turned out, their highest estimate since the 2014 protests. Organizers have yet to give their estimates which are usually far higher.

Hong Kong has a separate legal system through the “one country, two systems” deal struck between Britain and China.

Historically the city has baulked at mainland extraditions because of the opacity of China’s criminal justice system and its liberal use of the death penalty.

But earlier this year Hong Kong’s government announced plans to overhaul its extradition rules, allowing the transfer of fugitives with mainland China, Macau and Taiwan on a “case-basis” for the first time.

Chris Patten, the last British governor of Hong Kong, became the latest figure to criticize the extradition proposal ahead of Sunday’s protest.

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News and Politics

Selah Freedom CEO says trafficking victims are ‘sold for sex between 15 and 40 times a day’

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Selah Freedom CEO, Elizabeth Melendez Fisher

January marks Human Trafficking Awareness Month, a 31-day period when dozens of organizations and advocates enlighten the public on the “modern day slavery” happening in their own backyards. While the #MeToo movement has become the forefront of sexual harassment crimes the global epidemic of sex trafficking continues to get swept under the rug. With efforts of foundation’s like Selah Freedom lead by Elizabeth Melendez Fisher, who’s been instrumental in providing residential programming, outreach, and prevention for survivors, there is certainly progression towards ending the exploitation.

We spoke with Fisher recently to discuss some of the alarming statistics, major targeted areas, and how her foundation works to get the victims back on track after the traumatic experiences.

What prompted you to launch Selah Freedom and what is the focus of the organization’s work?

I did not wake up one day and say, “Oh! My purpose is to start this organization.” Rather for me, I [simply] was trying to do a woman’s event and find an underdog charity. I had just moved to Florida from Chicago and was told our local kids are being sold for sex.

Coming to Sarasota, Florida from a market like Chicago where you know your crimes –– we’re pretty notorious for what we do. To hear in Sarasota and the whole Tampa Bay region that our children are being sold for sex and purchased by our own people –– that is the definition of sex trafficking in America (Florida is number three in the country).

One out of every three little girls is being sexually abused and one out of every five little boys is being sexually abused.

They are coerced in and sold for sex [between] 15 and 40 times a day [affecting] over 300,000 of our American children at any zip code.

I literally just wanted to write a check but there was no one to write a check to –– it just snowballed. You can’t hear something like that and turn away.

Will you share with us some of the emotional and physical effects survivors deal with as a result of their trauma?

What I think is interesting is that people say, “Aren’t they choosing this?” What I can say is [most of our] survivors that have come through our residential outreach program have [gone to] drug or alcohol rehab usually around 20 times. Throwing a kid or a young adult into drug rehab to get better is the [equivalent] of trying to band-aid a symptom. The truth is until the root is healed they will just walk out of rehab and become numb again because they don’t want to think about all the things they feel. For us, the success has been really helping them get to the root and undue that trauma. We have an amazing partnership with Dr. Jason Quintal. The level of trauma these girls have is like nothing you could imagine.

How do you work to build trust with the survivors?

As I mentioned, we have a prevention arm which is to help kids from even getting into this. Our residential arm would not even have anybody in a bed if we didn’t have the outreach program. Our outreach program is literally in conjunction with: state attorneys –– judges –– courts –– law enforcement. We will sometimes pursue relationships with a girl that’s on the street, in jail, or in the court because of the circumstances of her being sold for sex.

How are health care providers, and emergency medicine physicians, in particular, uniquely positioned to help victims of human trafficking?

I think that it’s the first point of contact that walks in with the girl so if we have a girl that is needing medical care then having somebody that she trusts to go with her really helps. We trained a thousand law enforcement trainers just this past 12 months –– 40 of them in the state of Connecticut. First responders need to be trained so they can quickly shift and put on their compassion hats. If girls don’t look like victims but they are victims first responders need to change the paradigm of how they see this population. From the beginning, in 2011, cops were like, “We hate this population!” Now they are relentlessly running after them and helping them realize that they know. It was like if their daughter had something happen and they didn’t know and she ran into the hands of someone who’s been abusing her for six years on the street.

The average victim of abuse gets five to seven times of intervention before they will receive help because of the trauma and inability to understand that they need it so high.

Our girls will say it took two years of Selah telling me, “I’m worth more.” It took 20 times [before] getting me to take a bed. We have such a dedicated staff and community network in all of our markets around the country that are relentlessly pursuing these girls. It’s so hard to get them to trust –– two years of investment usually.

What percentage of recruiting happens via social media?

The percentages are increasing so rapidly. It’s interesting because a girl that’s been abused when was she’s little, now, her uncle may have used her for his fun or with a friend, and now, he [film’s] her for child porn-ups where anybody can buy it. He can advertise her through online sites where there’s code that people use when ordering a kid, almost like ordering a pizza. Many of the girls were escorted and driven into homes with people waiting to buy sex with them when they were 15 years old. Although the adult will claim, “I didn’t know she was 15!”

We have made it a commodity to buy sex anytime you want and there is plenty of places to look for it. Even with our children, the access that they have. I always tell people to beware of the power of the portal. The predators are so much more skilled on it then we are at reaching our kids.

What are some of the common trends you’ve noticed in terms of the victims the predators seek?

With international trafficking, it’s very different. Parents are deceived and they think they’re sending their kid off for this great opportunity or they can’t afford to eat so they sell a child. In America, it’s purely because of the epidemic and the secret of childhood sexual abuse.

For every girl that we’ve ever worked with, the statistics will tell you 92 percent of survivors of sex trafficking are also survivors of childhood sexual abuse.

Of the 3800, that we’ve worked with since we’ve started the organization in 2011, 100 percent of the abused kids was from someone they knew. It’s impossible to have a child be sexually abused and not have affected them in one way or another. Almost every woman I know has been abused. Our prevention program is my heart and soul because I believe every kid should have an opportunity to have an intervention to shut this down before reaching that point.

What is it about Atlanta that makes it the number one hub for Human Tracking in the United States?

I think that Atlanta is the same as Chicago and New York –– major metro cities. We’ve had a lot of girls run away from other markets to Atlanta. It’s just like the other major cities, it’s shared numbers. The bottom line is anywhere you go it’s happening but Atlanta is one of the forerunners.

We have one of the organizations their called Wellspring Living, which got [sex trafficking] on the radar by noting the numbers. It’s an epidemic and it’s happening everywhere. Atlanta is a destination city.

The International Labour Organization estimates that there are 40.3 million victims of human trafficking globally, about how many of the victims are rescued?

That’s a hard question because until a few years ago they weren’t even tracking it correctly with a system for the law enforcement to identify. They were convicting people with old slavery laws. In the last six years, they’re a [number] of laws that have been changed and is drastically improving.

The numbers are astronomical and they say half a million American kids are sold in any zip code. The very tip of the iceberg is what we are finally starting to reveal. There’s never been a 7-year-old that grows up and says, ” I want to be a sex worker.”

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World

South Africa becomes Largest Country in the World to Legalize Cannabis for Personal Use

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Smoking cannabis in the comfort of your home has officially been decriminalized in South Africa. As of Sept. 18, the country ruled that citizens have the right to consume and grow marijuana for personal use.

The court’s decision came after the discovery of the conflict between their drug policies and the constitution’s right to privacy and the “personal use” of dagga, as it’s known in South Africa.

“The right to privacy is not confined to a home or private dwelling,” deputy chief justice Raymond Zondo wrote in his judgment. “It will not be a criminal offense for an adult person to use or be in possession of cannabis in private space.”

According to Time magazine, the court has given parliament 24 hours to approve the ruling and to decide on the amount a person can grow or use privately. Although, smoking marijuana in public is still banned.

“A police officer would have to consider all the circumstances including the quantity of cannabis found in an adult person’s possession,” the judgment said, adding that a court would ultimately decide intention to deal, which is still illegal.

Last year, Lesotho became the first African country to grant licenses for the medicinal cultivation of marijuana. Eswatini and Zimbabwe are attempting to follow suit by legalizing cannabis farming, but are still fighting the rigid conservative sections of the country.

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