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Demi Lovato kicks Photoshop to the Curb ––shows off Natural Body

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Pop star Demi Lovato is completely over filtering images of herself in order to meet social media’s unrealistic standards of beauty.

In her latest Instagram post, Lovato dropped a sexy bikini pic, showing off her curvaceous figure. What seemed to be just another IG photo-op turned out to be a powerful statement, empowering women to embrace their natural bodies.

“This is my biggest fear. A photo of me in a bikini unedited. And guess what, it’s CELLULIT!!!!” Lovato wrote. 

“I’m just literally sooooo tired of being ashamed of my body, editing it (yes the other bikini pics were edited — and I hate that I did that but it’s the truth) so that others think I’m THEIR idea of what beautiful is, but it’s just not me. This is what I got.” 

Lovato’s post instantly went viral, inspiring women everywhere to adore their curves, stretch marks, dimples, and more. 

Take a look at some of the Twitter reactions below.

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‘Always’ removes Feminine Logo to accommodate Transgender Men

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Staple sanitary product brand, ‘Always’ has announced its controversial decision to remove the feminine logo from the brand’s packaging to accommodate the transgender men who use the products.

Procter & Gamble (P&G) greenlighted the switch to abolish the female sexual identity mark after being pressured by transgender activists.

In June, transgender campaigner Ben Saunders reportedly contacted Always on Twitter, questioning why the brand used feminine logos on all of their packaging.

At the time, another activist who goes by Melly Bloom on Twitter made the same complaint asking why it was ‘imperative’ to have the Venus sign on their products.

Both feel that the company, owned by Proctor & Gamble, exclude transgender and non-binary people who use the items.

Since both complaints were made, Always has said it will now aim to remove the signs from their packaging from December 2019, with aims to have it distributed everywhere by February 2020.

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All Hail the Queen of Climate Strikes –– Greta Thunberg

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Greta Thunberg –– a fearless 16-year-old Swedish climate change activist who’s influencing youth around the globe to take action against global warming. 

GretaThunberg/Facebook

Thunberg has inspired the birth of more than 2,400 events across an estimated 115 countries and 1,000 cities from Sept. 20–27 as part of the UN climate summit. On Sept. 23, the changemaker is scheduled to make a formal address. 

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A few years ago, no one knew her name and, now, Thunberg has become a pint-sized force to be reckoned with, and politicians have taken notice. Who is she? Where is she from? How did she gain 1.2 million supporters? Here’s the scoop below:

 August 2018 changed the game…

In her home country of Sweden, Greta staged the first school strike for climate change) outside the Swedish parliament building in August of last year. Thunberg had been inspired by a previous school class walk-out, in Florida against US gun violence, and she thought it was the best way to break ground.

GretaThunberg/Facebook

It was just after Europe had experienced a record-breaking heatwave and forest fires had raged through Sweden. Her parents were unsure and none of Thunberg’s classmates were willing to join, but she went by herself, with her bike, a hand-painted sign, and climate change fact sheets.

Thunberg staged her strike every day until the Swedish national election and, slowly but surely, people started to join her.

Environmental consciousness runs in the Thunberg family…

 Her father is Svante Thunberg, an actor, and author named after Svante Arrhenius, the Nobel prize-winning scientist who first calculated how carbon dioxide emissions could lead to the greenhouse effect.

GretaThunberg/Facebook

 Thunberg’s diagnosis’ fuel her fire for change…

She was diagnosed with Asperger’s Syndrome four-years-ago and she has since learned how to use it as a driving force in her campaigning, instead of letting it hold her back. Her Asperger’s means that Thunberg finds facts she learns about the environment more upsetting and distressing than others, and she can’t easily shake those feelings off. It’s spurred her on to act. She has also been diagnosed with OCD and selective mutism.

Thunberg discovered peace in panicking…

When she first learned about the climate crisis, she could not believe that adults weren’t making big enough changes.

“Our house is on fire. I am here to say, our house is on fire,” Thunberg wrote in a column for The Guardian. “Adults keep saying: ‘We owe it to the young people to give them hope.’ But I don’t want your hope. I don’t want you to be hopeful. I want you to panic. I want you to feel the fear I feel every day. And then I want you to act.”

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Black Student Awarded $725k in Lawsuit against Neo-Nazi Follower

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AP Photo/Susan Walsh

The first black woman to serve as American University’s student government president celebrated Friday after a lawsuit win in federal court against a neo-Nazi website manager who launched an online hate movement against her.

A federal judge awarded Taylor Dumspon, 22, approximately $725,000 after The Daily Stormer blog founder Andrew Anglin failed to respond to her lawsuit.

Dumpson was named student government president in 2017. The historic moment on AU’s campus amassed the attention of dozens of white supremacists, including Anglin, who directed his followers to troll Dumpson via social media after hearing the news, and a suspect who hung nooses with bananas containing racist messages on the university’s campus.

Here’s a breakdown of Dumpson’s settlement:

  • $101,429.28 for compensatory damages
  • $500,000 for punitive damages costs
  • $124,022.10 for attorneys’ fees and costs.

The judge is also said to have placed a restraining order against Anglin, his Moonbase Holdings limited liability company, and Brian Andrew Ade for internet harassment.

“This ruling should send a strong message to other white supremacists that they can and will be held accountable for hateful activity that constitutes unlawful discrimination, no matter whether it occurs online or in the real world,” said Kristen Clarke, the president and executive director of the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law. The organization represented Dumpson in the case.

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