Connect with us

Published

on

Coach announces the launch of Coach x Michael B. Jordan, the first-of-its-kind creative collaboration with actor, producer and first global face of Coach menswear, Michael B. Jordan. Inspired by his cultural influences and community, his love of Naruto, and his passion for bringing unique voices to the forefront, this unisex ready-to-wear, footwear and bag collection is Jordan’s first foray into fashion design, guided by the expertise of Coach Creative Director Stuart Vevers.

Created in partnership with VIZ Media, the collection combines Coach craftsmanship with Jordan’s affinity for functional fashion and graphic codes from the world of Naruto, a popular Japanese anime and manga. Product ranges from parkas, jean jackets, and pullovers to backpacks, utility packs and hybrid sneaker boots.

It features imagery of characters from Naruto, as well as the series’ trademark “eye” motifs reimagined with Coach’s Retro C graphic. The Naruto backstory speaks closely to Jordan’s narrative as an outlier building bridges inside and outside of the Hollywood establishment and echoes Coach’s commitment to community and courage.

To launch the collection, Coach releases a campaign that fuses its values and craftsmanship with Jordan’s cinematic skill and Naruto’s mystic iconography. 

The hero film, conceived by Jordan and directed by Rachel Morrison, who collaborated with Jordan previously as the director of photography on Black Panther, takes place in a neon-drenched Tokyo street, and moves between moments of modern-day grit and magical realism, placing an emphasis on the power of connection.

“With my name on this collection, it was important to design pieces that represent my cultural influences and my community; pieces that I could see my friends, family, and fans wearing with pride,” said Jordan. 

“As with all aspects of my work, this collection is about bringing fresh perspectives and unique voices to the forefront. Expanding into the fashion design space was rewarding beyond my expectations. I’m grateful to Stuart and Coach for providing me with the opportunity and expertise to execute a collection I’m extremely proud of.”

Coach will also celebrate the collection with global pop-ups in Japan, Malaysia and the United States, a dedicated Coach experience in the VIZ Media booth at New York Comic Con on October 3-6, and a range of limited-edition T-shirts.

The Coach x Michael B. Jordan collection is now available online at Coach.com and in stores.

Images courtesy of Coach.

Facebook Comments

Culture

In the World of High Fashion, Streetwear will have the last Laugh

Published

on

Arieanne Evans for NDLYSS

In 2019, Virgil Abloh, proclaimed king of streetwear/ -fashion, claimed that street fashion will die in the 2020s. Through the 2010s, streetwear fashion designer Virgil Abloh convinced luxury fashion that streetwear was stylistically and culturally important. Before falling from grace, streetwear will develop away from global mass production and refocus with regional and local attention. Streetwear won’t die but it will look different.

Streetwear is the fashion of working and middle-class people. Therefore, streetwear’s death would proceed to deconstructing social class. Unless Abloh is hinting at staging a social revolution, streetwear will remain prevalent until the streets die. Streetwear is a cultural phenomenon that laced its way through America’s soul. This fashion developed through the 1990s New York hip-hop and California skate cultures then became nationally and now globally recognized. Streetwear grew from freedom to move and expresses individuality without stretching a budget.

“Just because you don’t see a celebrity wearing it, doesn’t mean it’s not high fashion,” Set by Skye founder Marina Skye said.

Arieanne Evans for NDLYSS

Affordable fashion brings streetwear its commercial acclaim. The sometimes higher quality fabrics and designer names of high fashion brands establish greater prices. Fortunately, fashion is cheap to replicate by mass-producing high street styles from runway to store. Fashion is produced fast for consumer demands and ever-fluctuating trends and It’s equally disposed of quickly once hot trends change. Unfortunately, fast fashion is unsustainable by wasting material and both exploiting and underpaying workers who produce the materials.

Fast fashion fades when people intentionally buy clothes, develop personal styles that transcend brand recognition, and advocate for international workers’ rights. Luckily, streetwear’s inexpensive nature exists outside of fast fashion. Streetwear integrates wardrobes with thrifted and old/ vintage pieces. It’s cheap by necessity and doesn’t rely on brands.

More so by its versatility and attention to comfort than its expense, streetwear is the working person’s fashion. The comfort aspect plays well to its reach. Streetwear rests on the ability to move, be dirty, and make mistakes. Oversized, distressed, and unsymmetrical streetwear styling speaks to its versatility by offering everyone unique a unique sense of style, unlike high fashion which has historically excluded the Black community and the full spectrum of body types.

The streets are immortal, therefore streetwear is eternal. Where trends change, the streets adapt, and adapting is local before its global. The “fall of streetwear” will likely be a fall of fast and high fashion. That will give rise to local fashion influenced by regional climate, lifestyle, and culture.

Arieanne Evans for NDLYSS

“As a community, we have to push young designers as much as possible,” Wish Creative Director Renaldo Nehemiah asserted. “We should showcase designers who deserve to represent fashion.”

It’s clear that Abloh has reservations about his capacity to push fashion culture. This should motivate young and aspiring designers to match his enterprising energy and carry the torch of contemporary design. Street fashion will continue elevating individuality and revolutionary approaches to style through the ’20s and beyond.

Everyone can join the movement of developing fashion by buying black-owned and newly enterprising art, fashion and designs from local producers. No one has more influence on the streets than the streets, so the people on the ground level are next-up as big names and mass production will be next-out.

Facebook Comments

Continue Reading

Style

Adidas Yeezy Boost 350 v2 ‘Tailgate’ will reportedly drop February 2020

Published

on

Hanuzing

It’s been a monumental year for the adidas Yeezy BOOST 350 V2. With the ‘Yeezreel’ and ‘Yecheil’ renditions scheduled for December, the latest ‘Tailgate’ theme is primed to follow-up in 2020. Somewhat a mashup of previous releases like the ‘Lundmark’ and ‘Static’, the latest color-way opts for grey Primeknit uppers, reflective lacing, and clean, cream-colored midsoles.

The hot pick can be purchased at $220 USD via  yeezysupply.com, and is set to release at select retailers February 2020.

Facebook Comments

Continue Reading

Business

Selfridges embraces Conscious Consumerism with Sustainable partnership –– Depop

Published

on

Lewis Ronald

Luxury fashion store, Selfridges announces the Depop Space Selfridges pop-up, as a new study1 reveals Gen Z’s purchasing decisions are increasingly based on sustainability concerns. This innovative fashion pop-up is one of several existing and forthcoming activities that reflect the store’s on-going commitment to reimagining what shopping and style might look like in response to the climate emergency.

As a retailer, Selfridges is continually seeking new ways to become more circular and help to drive radical transformation of the industry by collaborating with brands and partners whose activities challenge the way we experience and enjoy fashion.

The Depop focus for September is to ‘Recreate the New: Fashioned for the Planet’ – and focuses on sustainability, featuring sellers who advocate for reducing fashion’s global impact and reflect Selfridges’ prioritization of providing sustainable and ethical fashion choices for its shoppers. 

The Depop Space Selfridges installation aims to reimagine the retail space in an industry where the environmental impact of fashion is increasingly at the forefront of customer’s minds. 

Lewis Ronald

During September, Depop sellers such as Sam Nowell and designer Patrick McDowell will host hands-on workshops for the public, teaching customers how to extend the life of pre-loved garments through reworking, tailoring and customization.

Selfridges’ new Shopper Study data, conducted by OnePoll, backs up the push from young consumers to shop ethically. Two-thirds (63%) of Gen Z shoppers said they were more concerned about climate change and sustainability issues than they were just one year ago. Concerns for the environment are influencing their shopping choices with over three-quarters (77%) of this age profile saying that when they are thinking about the products they buy their biggest environmental concern is that they want their choices to reduce waste.

Selfridges Head of Sustainability, Daniella Vega commented: “We are excited to be taking the lead in sustainable fashion by this first-of-its-kind collaboration with Depop in the UK. Selfridges takes seriously its responsibility to protect the environment and our Buying Better Inspiring Change initiative always looks for ways to push the boundaries in luxury retail – to challenge the norm. This new survey data supports our understanding of our youngest adult fashion shoppers, for whom there is no compromise when it comes to seeking out style that doesn’t harm the planet. We are committed to buying better and inspiring change so that our customers can do the same.”

Lewis Ronald

Depop Space Selfridges will showcase different Depop sellers each week exhibiting a selection of key pieces from their Depop collections available for purchase only at Selfridges. An additional exclusive collection of pieces is available online on​ ​Selfridges.com​. The retail space itself will act to physically reimagine the digital marketplace with a kinetic rail that visitors can control to view the range on offer

The Depop Space Selfridges follows Selfridges recent commitment and signing of the Fashion Pact, as unveiled at the recent G7 Summit, as well as the introduction of its latest cohort of Bright New Things designers.

Release provided by Selfridges.

Facebook Comments

Continue Reading

Trending