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Film director Kim A. Snyder has returned to Sundance Film Festival 2020 with another groundbreaking documentary, US Kids, sharing the untold accounts of heroes who survived tragic mass shootings in America.

Following the success of her Peabody award-winning documentary Newtown in 2016, Snyder now taps into the aftermath of a mass shooting that occurred on Feb.14, 2018, when a gunman opened fire with a semi-automatic rifle at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, killing 17 people and injuring 17 others, in what became the deadliest shooting at a high school in United States

Film Synopsis: Determined to turn unfathomable tragedy into action, the teenage survivors (Emma Gonzalez, David Hogg, Sam Fuentes, Jackie Corin, Bria Smith, Alex King, Alex Dworet, Annika Dworet, and Natalie Barden) of Parkland, Florida catalyze a powerful, unprecedented youth movement that spreads with lightning speed across the country, as a generation of mobilized youth take back democracy in this powerful coming-of-age story.

NDLYSS spoke with Snyder at the world premiere on Jan. 25 at The Marc Theatre in Parc City, Utah to get the behind-the-scenes scoop on the making of the project.

The veteran director is currently seeking distribution.

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America Ferrera delivers fiery Speech at 2020 Impact Awards, celebrating Latinx Inclusion in Hollywood

“If you empower us, we will deliver beautiful content and voracious audiences – and we promise to make it a party!”

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BEVERLY HILLS, CALIFORNIA – FEBRUARY 28: Honoree America Ferrera speaks onstage during the 23rd Annual NHMC Impact Awards Gala at the Beverly Wilshire Four Seasons Hotel on February 28, 2020 in Beverly Hills, California. (Photo by JC Olivera/Getty Images for National Hispanic Media Coalition )

The National Hispanic Media Coalition (NHMC) hosted its 2020 annual Impact Awards Gala at the Beverly Wilshire Four Seasons Hotel on Friday (February 28) in Beverly Hills, Calif, celebrating the Latinx community’s progress in media over the past year.

Emcees Justina Machado and Jacob Vargas welcomed nearly 500 attendees, coming together to support NHMC’s advocacy work for a more inclusive entertainment industry toward the Latinos, at the star-studded gala at the Beverly Wilshire.

Attendees included: Alberto Zeni,Alejandro Anda, Annie Gonzalez, Carlos Santos, Diego Tinoco, Eddie Martinez, Elle Paris-Legaspi,Gabrielle Ruiz, Gloria Calederon Kellett, J.J. Soria, Jesse Garcia, Karrie Martin, Laura Patalano, Linda Yvette Chavez, Marvin Bryan Lemus, Nadine Velazquez, Niko Guardado, Jeffrey Katzenberg, Karey Burke, Marie Sylla-Dixon,Patricia Riggen, Peter Villegas, Raquel Justice, Tanya Saracho, Toby Emmerich, Zulay Henao, and more.

Actress America Ferrera was honored among others with the Outstanding Series Producer Impact Award. The mother-to-be, 35, was simply glowing last night as she gave a groundbreaking speech in front of her Hollywood peers.

“Thank you to our allies in the room – those of you who are not particularly from the Latino community – and yet, you have the capacity to see the value of our lives, of our stories; you invest your money in our storytellers and give real creative power to our voices,” she said.

“If you empower us, we will deliver beautiful content and voracious audiences – and we promise to make it a party!”

Ferrera also revealed earlier in the afternoon that she would be leaving NBC’s hit workplace comedy Superstore after it’s upcoming fifth season finale.

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Watch: The iconic MLK Speech America has ignored

In honor of MLK Day, let us dive back in time to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s radical speech at Stanford on April 14, 1967, dubbed as “The other America”.

Dr. King addressed plans to mobilize a multiracial movement of America’s poor, seeking possible allies for his Poor People’s Campaign.

The speech came 10 days after declaring his opposition regarding the Vietnam War, King instead, pushed for economic and social equality.

He depicted “two Americas” to pinpoint the growing poverty gap in the United States as a root of inequality.

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In the World of High Fashion, Streetwear will have the last Laugh

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Arieanne Evans for NDLYSS

In 2019, Virgil Abloh, proclaimed king of streetwear/ -fashion, claimed that street fashion will die in the 2020s. Through the 2010s, streetwear fashion designer Virgil Abloh convinced luxury fashion that streetwear was stylistically and culturally important. Before falling from grace, streetwear will develop away from global mass production and refocus with regional and local attention. Streetwear won’t die but it will look different.

Streetwear is the fashion of working and middle-class people. Therefore, streetwear’s death would proceed to deconstructing social class. Unless Abloh is hinting at staging a social revolution, streetwear will remain prevalent until the streets die. Streetwear is a cultural phenomenon that laced its way through America’s soul. This fashion developed through the 1990s New York hip-hop and California skate cultures then became nationally and now globally recognized. Streetwear grew from freedom to move and expresses individuality without stretching a budget.

“Just because you don’t see a celebrity wearing it, doesn’t mean it’s not high fashion,” Set by Skye founder Marina Skye said.

Arieanne Evans for NDLYSS

Affordable fashion brings streetwear its commercial acclaim. The sometimes higher quality fabrics and designer names of high fashion brands establish greater prices. Fortunately, fashion is cheap to replicate by mass-producing high street styles from runway to store. Fashion is produced fast for consumer demands and ever-fluctuating trends and It’s equally disposed of quickly once hot trends change. Unfortunately, fast fashion is unsustainable by wasting material and both exploiting and underpaying workers who produce the materials.

Fast fashion fades when people intentionally buy clothes, develop personal styles that transcend brand recognition, and advocate for international workers’ rights. Luckily, streetwear’s inexpensive nature exists outside of fast fashion. Streetwear integrates wardrobes with thrifted and old/ vintage pieces. It’s cheap by necessity and doesn’t rely on brands.

More so by its versatility and attention to comfort than its expense, streetwear is the working person’s fashion. The comfort aspect plays well to its reach. Streetwear rests on the ability to move, be dirty, and make mistakes. Oversized, distressed, and unsymmetrical streetwear styling speaks to its versatility by offering everyone unique a unique sense of style, unlike high fashion which has historically excluded the Black community and the full spectrum of body types.

The streets are immortal, therefore streetwear is eternal. Where trends change, the streets adapt, and adapting is local before its global. The “fall of streetwear” will likely be a fall of fast and high fashion. That will give rise to local fashion influenced by regional climate, lifestyle, and culture.

Arieanne Evans for NDLYSS

“As a community, we have to push young designers as much as possible,” Wish Creative Director Renaldo Nehemiah asserted. “We should showcase designers who deserve to represent fashion.”

It’s clear that Abloh has reservations about his capacity to push fashion culture. This should motivate young and aspiring designers to match his enterprising energy and carry the torch of contemporary design. Street fashion will continue elevating individuality and revolutionary approaches to style through the ’20s and beyond.

Everyone can join the movement of developing fashion by buying black-owned and newly enterprising art, fashion and designs from local producers. No one has more influence on the streets than the streets, so the people on the ground level are next-up as big names and mass production will be next-out.

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